Eavesdropping on My Kids

IMG_1156“Are you in New York, Violet?” “No, Max is in New York.”

“You earned a watermelon slice. You’re a bad, bad baby.”

“History, Violet? Hurry, run away Violet!”

“Sam I am…”

“I wanna watch Paw Patrol.” “Not Paw Patrol, Violet. Gaw Gatrol.”

“Violet, you have cookie eyebrows.” “No, I don’t have cookie eyebrows.”

“Violet, you’re a bad baby.” “No. I’m not a bad baby.”

“I’ll be Rubble. You be Chase.” “I’ll be Everest! I’ll be Jake and Rubble and Skye!”

“Violet, you’re stinky.” “No, I’m not stinky! I’m NOOOOOOOTTTTTT!”

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Ten Apple-licious Things

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I told you brooches were coming back.

THE apple pie. (It takes some confidence to give your recipe a name like that.)

Who says you can’t play with your food?

This apple-glazed pheasant looks AMAZING.

An apple for the teacher.

Beware! Some apples are poison. (Well, some poisonous things are called apples, even if they aren’t apples really, and some things used to be called apples and aren’t really poisonous at all.)

Any bookworm would love to burrow into this apple.

What exactly is the apple of your eye?

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Weird and Wonderful Books to Read in October

It’s the Halloween season, with candy corn in all the stores and Hocus Pocus playing constantly on ABC Family (or whatever they changed the name to) but that doesn’t mean you necessarily want to read a Halloween book. Horror isn’t for all of us, and you can only read Dracula so many times (I maxed out at three). But if you want to read something sort of eerie, a little bit creepy, or slightly strange this month, something with a little substance and no real scares, you might want to pick up one (or all) of these titles.

St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves by Karen Russell

Karen Russell is one of my absolute favorite authors. This collection of short stories is probably my favorite, with women turning into silk worms, girls struggling with their feral natures, and as much sparky, sparkling prose as you could ever want.

The Girl in the Flammable Skirt by Aimee Bender

Aimee Bender is so weird but also sort of incredibly normal. There’s a lot of magic in the mundane in her fictional world, and I think that’s what makes her work so special.

After the Quake by Haruki Murakami

We all know Haruki Murakami is a genius, but I think his work isn’t always the most accessible. I think one way he really connects with his readers is through the use of magical realism (or whatever you want to call that phenomenon of using magic and fantasy within a realistic story–something all of the books in this list do), which gives the reader a metaphorical way of understanding his stories. Plus, giant toads and little green monsters are amusing.

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

You probably heard that Kazuo Ishiguro just won the Nobel Prize for Literature, which I think is awesome. He’s such a fantastic writer, and this is my favorite of his novels (though I admittedly haven’t read them all). Closer to science fiction than fantasy, this book presents the perspective of a very special young woman who was not meant to be special at all. I don’t want to give anything away, though they did make this into a movie a few years ago so you might already know the gist of it. But even if you saw the movie, read the book. It’s so totally worth it.

 

 

Writing Exercise: Llama Llama

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAThis is Magnet, may he rest in peace. He was my mother’s pet for a while, along with his brother, Laredo. He liked to ride in the back of the van and stick his head out the window. He spit a lot. He wasn’t particularly snuggly and he could be hard to catch. He liked my parents, though, but llamas and cats share a lot of personality traits, especially the aloofness.

So there you go: write about Magnet. Good inspiration, huh?

Try to write for at least five minutes.

Mine: